Glenn Charles

Adventurer | Photographer | Connector

Today I am a Time Traveler with a Camera... Tomorrow, who knows

Are you prepared - Tarps

I have worked my way up into the pacific northwest and am now getting myfirst taste of the much storied weather. Lucky for me I was prepared withthe right tarp and tarp skills.

A tarp, in my opinion is an absolute essential for any type of travel. Silnylon tarps weigh ounces and when paired with 3mm parachute cord fit in avery small stuff sack. Having a tarp is not enough if you are not skilledin how to set one up. Nothing is more frustrating than a downpour with atarp that won't take the weather.

I use a 20ft top line with 6ft tie outs on each lash point of an 8x10 owaretarp. This provides me with great flexibility in how the tarp is hung . Insevere weather I can go low to the ground providing important protectionfrom wind and driving rain. In more benign conditions I can string the tarphigher for more living space.

I learned this neat trick from the hammock community for attaching the tarpto the top line which allows you to easily adjust its location. It involvesattaching two prussick hitches to your line and then hooking each hitch tothe tiny s-biners (5lb ones). These s-biners then clip to your tarp,allowing you to slide the setup left or right and then to tension the wholesetup by sliding each hitch outwards. I will post picks and instructionsshortly.

I have also added tie outs to the bike, one at the head tube and one on theseat post as attachment points for two guy lines. This allows me to use thebike as one of the endpoints for the tarp setup by simply staking out oneside of the bike using two 4ft guy lines. I can now roll to a stop, findone more point such as a tree, picnic table or stick, pull the tarp off theseat post and have a large dry area setup in a matter of minutes.

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